Sunday, 21 August 2011

Project Log Store - update.

My friends moved house earlier this year. They bought a place with a degree of demolition and rebuilding required. Consequently they acquired lots of building materials on wooden pallets. That’s where I come in. Me and my log store. Which, I realise is a project that I haven’t updated but in my defence I did say that my projects, however apparently simple, tend to take a long time. Lots of thinking and very little action. Like the ubiquitous duck I’m calm and inactive above the water line, while below and out of sight my legs are going like the clappers. Anyway, I came home from their building site home last week with my trailer fully laden with pallets to take to bits and utilise the wood for the log store. Cue Lesson One; How to dissemble a double sided wooden pallet, without effort, brute strength and without splitting the wood.
Answer One: Impossible.
I even looked it up on the Internet and found lots of men explaining different ways to do it, but all involved hefting pallets, crowbars and heavy mash hammers, none of which I can do. One plausible option involved sawing through the nails with a reciprocating saw, not possible as I don’t have one but it could be going on my Christmas list. What a great thing! But no. Surely there must be an alternative way for girlies, weak men, people with back problems and the pathologically lazy? After a lot of lateral thought I’ve discovered that there is. I’ve found that the humble car jack, hidden under the boot mat, has a number of uses that don’t involve cars. It’s the perfect tool for dismantling pallets, without any effort at all. You can sit on the lawn in the sun, insert the jack into the space between the inside and outside planks, turn the handle and there we are, pallets in pieces of perfectly usable wood, after the nails have been straightened and knocked out. Yes, it’s quite time consuming but that’s something I have lots of.


Chico thinks it's great fun but Rolf found it all pretty boring and kept butting in with a welly to indicate that it was time for a walk.Here he is having also done a bit of 'weeding'. Tess, as always, is quietly in the background being good and minding her own business.




Here’s the results so far;



I’ve followed the design most often recommended although I suspect that my gaps are probably a tad on the large side. And making the roof a foot higher would have made for fewer future head injuries but hey, it’ll do.
The shelf on which the logs will sit will also be made out of pallets, allowing air to circulate to season the logs well. And then they’ll burn well in my wood-burning stove, making my home warm and snug with that lovely flickering orange glow. I love sitting watching the flames. More-so when the weather is foul and cold and wet and I can hear the wind buffeting the walls and wailing down the chimneys. It makes the dark winter nights much more acceptable.
And, even better, the log store will free up my shed for ‘shed appropriate’ contents which formerly lived around my house. Previously it was logs in the shed, drills in the airing cupboard, circular saws in the kitchen, hammers in the bedroom etc. Not very feminine maybe, but then I’m advised that my delight in a shed full of ‘men things’ is not a normal female reaction either. One of my current favourites is my auger. A giant corkscrew for making holes for uprights.

It may well be difficult to use in some ground but in my garden even I managed it. Instead of having to dig (which I can’t do) it twists easily into the soil and removes a nice round plug. It enabled me to build my log store without having to wait for help and therefore I love it. Surely any woman would?
Thanks to P and W and their home move I’ve got an almost free log store. Or I will have if I ever get it finished. I just need some roofing material now. I wonder if their garage needs re-roofing. What was that? Did I hear someone say scrounger?

3 comments:

  1. Now thats a log store! Well done, and if theres any spare logs???

    ReplyDelete
  2. Heh! Thanks Cheyenne. Scrounger.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yep! Every penny is a prisoner!

    ReplyDelete